Student places for weather simulation video game

University of Oklahoma Computer Science Senior Taner Davis won second place for his research on a weather simulation video game, “Storm Lab,” at the 22nd Annual Research Day at the Capitol on March 27-28, 2017. Davis’ research was funded by the OU Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies (CIMMS).

Davis’ presentation was titled “Large-Scale Weather Simulation as an Education Video Game.” He competed against 25 other Oklahoma undergraduate students in the annual event hosted by the Oklahoma Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (OK EPSCoR). The Moore native was one of two students selected by OU’s Office of Undergraduate Research to represent the university at the Capitol.

Taner Davis, whose research was funded by OU CIMMS, won second place for his research on a weather simulation video game, “Storm Lab,” at the 22nd Annual Research Day at the Oklahoma State Capitol on March 28, 2017.

Davis worked with Dr. Amy McGovern in developing an educational game to teach middle school students how the motion of air masses in the atmosphere result in different weather experienced on the ground. The game’s goal is to help K-12 students learn an important earth science standard through observation and experiment.

Davis’ role in the project focuses on programming and optimization of the simulation. McGovern and OU CIMMS research and OU School of Meteorology PhD student Ryan Lagerquist participated in the research.

The OK EPSCoR competition included a three-minute oral presentation to a panel of EPSCoR-appointed judges on Monday. Later that evening during a poster session, judges visited with students about their research and asked follow-up questions. Awards presentations at the Oklahoma State Capitol and visits with legislators concluded the event the next day.

Research Day at the Capitol is sponsored by the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, OK EPSCoR and the National Science Foundation.